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While still considered a relative newcomer to the PC-cooling market, ID-Cooling has really started to put pressure on its competitors. With releases like the SE-914-XT and SE-224-XT, they have shown they can offer top-tier performance for your dollar. The company has also expanded into numerous regions and stepped up its game by delivering a diverse portfolio of cooling products. In addition, each revision of a product or new product release has shown new improvements or additional features. Suffice it to say, if they keep that up, I expect they will continue to grow at a rapid pace.

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

Today’s review focuses on the ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black. As the name implies, it is an all-black design that features dual-tower designs with two 120 mm fans and the option to install a third. While not quite as big as the true heavyweight air-cooling monster towers from Noctua, be quiet!, Deepcool, etc., this more affordable option looks to take them on from a value standpoint. But it is not alone in that regard as the Scythe Fuma 2 is similar in size and value, making it the SE-207-XT’s main competitor in this segment.

Specifications
Manufacturer: ID-Cooling
Model: SE-207-XT Black
Socket Support: Intel: LGA1200, LGA1150, LGA1151, LGA1155, LGA1156, LGA2011, and LGA2066
AMD: AM4
Heatsink: Material: Aluminium (fins)
Copper (heat pipes)
Dimensions: 144 x 122 x 157 mm (with fan)
Heat pipes: Ø6 mm – 7 pcs
Weight: 1300g (with all accessories)
Fan: Model: No model number listed
Dimensions: 120 x 120 x 25 mm
Fan Speed: 700–1800 RPM
Fan Airflow: 76.16 CFM (maximum)
Fan Noise: 15.2–35.2 dBA
Features: Full copper base
Black coated micro wave heatsink fins
Dual PWM fans
Compatible with memory up to 50 mm tall
280-watt TDP
Warranty: Two years
MSRP: $54.99

Packaging

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

 

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

 

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

Much like other ID-Cooling products, the packaging keeps the familiar black and orange scheme. The font is the SE-207-XT Black in all its glory, with nothing else to see but its hulking form. A quick turn to the left side of the box gives a quick rundown of its features, including its silent operation, easy installation, black coating, etc., along with the TDP, which ID-Cooling lists as 280 watts. Also listed here are the supported sockets, which have been paired down. Unfortunately, the SE-207-XT only supports Socket AM4 on AMD, while on Intel, support for LGA775 and LGA1366 has been dropped. Not a big deal, it is something to keep in mind if you’re playing around with older hardware. Meanwhile, the backside has the cooler’s specifications, including the overall dimensions, fan RPM range, CFM, etc.

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

 

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

The right side has images that detail the cooler’s dimensions, but oddly missing is the cooler’s height; however, it is listed in the specifications table and, as such, not a huge omission. Finally, the top has the product name and nothing else.

Contents

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

The cooler comes with the fans pre-mounted and packed in some foam. As for the universal mounting hardware, it is placed in a separate, smaller box. While not the best packaging I have seen, there is no wasted space here, and the cooler arrived safe and sound, which is, as you might guess, a plus.

ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

Socket support is quite robust even with the removal of older sockets. AM4 is AMD’s current mainstream socket and has been for years. Meanwhile, Intel’s LGA775 is long since dead, and LGA1366 is long in the tooth, so to speak. As such, the absence of AM2, AM3, and the previously mentioned Intel sockets isn’t a huge deal.

Common parts supplied for mounting include:

  • 6x Fan clips
  • 4x AMD screws
  • 4x Plastic standoffs
  • 4x Nuts
  • 4x LGA2011/2066 screws
  • 2x Intel mounting plates
  • 2x AMD mounting plate
  • 2x 120 mm fans
  • 1x Intel backplate
  • 1x 3-way PWM fan splitter cable
  • 1x Heatsink
  • 1x Tube of thermal paste
  • 1x Instruction manual
  • 1x ID-Cooling badge

    A Closer Look

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    While quite large compared to more contemporary single-tower coolers, the ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black is still quite hefty and similar in size to the Scythe Fuma 2. Unlike the Fuma 2, the SE-207-XT has seven instead of six heat pipes, which should result in better heat transfer and thus performance, but as data has shown in the past, that is not always the case. In regards to the fin design, they are relatively simple, with a visible sawtooth-like pattern.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    The all-black design is similar to the Montech Air Cooler 210 and previous Enermax offerings. It certainly gives the cooler a stealthier appearance since it should blend in on darker motherboards and inside a black chassis. So if you wanted to draw attention to a different component, the SE-207-XT Black could certainly help there. As for the dual fin-stacks, they are comprised of 44 aluminium fins each.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    The seven heat pipes are connected to the solid copper base, which on our sample was pretty damn flat, and a bit of a surprise. As for the base, since it doesn’t have a finish of any kind, the machining marks are visible, but small enough to be imperceptible to the touch. Obviously, the smoother the surface, the better, but I am not about to split hairs as I have seen coolers with mirror finishes that performed terribly, while HDT coolers (Heat-pipe Direct Touch) with huge gaps performed exceptionally well.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    When it comes to the fans, they are generic 120 mm offerings with an RPM range of 700 to 1800. The model number is ID-12025M12S.

    Installation

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    As is the norm for installing a cooler on Socket AM4, you will need to remove the plastic retention brackets. To do this, unscrew the two screws securing each one in place. Next, keep the AMD backplate on the board and then position the plastic spacers over the mounting holes. Once done, place the screw through the mounting arm, slide it through the plastic spacer, and secure it to the backplate. Honestly, a screw pillar setup would be easier and require less effort, but it seems I am talking to a wall in that regard. Still, once the mounting hardware is fully secured, you can apply the thermal paste.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    For the next step, you will need to remove the fans from the cooler to access the retention screws. Once ready, line the cooler up with the mounting brackets before securing it by alternating between the two screws. With the cooler firmly seated, it’s time to reinstall the fans and connect the wiring.

    As noted above, on AM4, the installation process could be improved. Depending on your situation, holding the AMD motherboard backplate in place while also holding together the mounting brackets with screws and spacers is not ideal. The use of friction-fit spacers on the screws would make the process a great deal easier without too much trouble and is a solution for some companies. Another option would be threaded standoffs. Meanwhile, on Intel, the process is exceptionally easy. The backplate is ready to go; slide it onto the board, position the spacers on it, attach the mounting arms, and secure them in place. The process after that remains the same.

    That said, when it comes to the installation instructions, ID-Cooling’s videos are spot on, but the included manual referenced brackets that didn’t exist for AM4, and honestly, whoever gave the green light to that manual likely needs to pay far more attention. Normally, manuals are pretty simple and serve their purpose, and therefore, I don’t touch on them all that much, but the errors here are egregious.

    Finished Looks

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    The SE-207-XT Basic does little to stand out visually, and in some ways, that is appealing. However, not everyone wants a cooler that screams “HEY, I AM HERE” from the rooftop. Instead, it is aesthetically pleasing by being at the opposite end of the spectrum. The all-black design of the SE-207-XT blends in exceptionally well with the rest of the system. The only hints of contrast are the fan clips and the ID-Cooling logo found on the fans. If the fan clips were also black and the fans didn’t have a logo, it would genuinely be a blacked-out cooler.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    In terms of memory and graphics card clearance, it is a bit hit or miss. You can get away with memory of up to 50 mm in height; however, I would say 45 mm is the limit if you want to avoid headaches. This means you will be limited to lower-profile memory modules unless you give up the front fan, but even then, the heatsink itself overhangs at least 1 DIMM slot. On the other hand, there are no problems to report when it comes to graphics card clearance.

    AMD Test System and Temperature Results

    AMD Test System
    Processor: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X
    3.85 GHz Base / 4.0 GHz OC
    Motherboard: ASUS ROG STRIX B550-E GAMING
    Memory: 2x 8 GB Crucial DDR4 3200 CL22
    Model : CT2K8G4DFRA32A
    Graphics Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1650
    Ventus XS OC Edition
    Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2 NVMe SSD
    Power Supply: Chieftec Chieftronic PowerPlay 850
    Case: Thermaltake Core P3
    Operating System: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
    Version 20H2 (October 2020 Update)
    Thermal Paste: Noctua NT-H2
    Other: Crucial Ballistix 2x 4GB DDR4 2400
    Model: BL2K4G24C16U4B
    (clearance testing only)

    Testing Procedure

    All testing is done at a room temperature of 22°C (72°F) with a 1°C margin of error. For the AMD test bench, the CPU’s 3.85 GHz base all-core clock is obtained using the AMD Wraith Prism cooler with the fan at maximum RPM. Once the all-core clock is verified, we limit the CPU to this frequency under load for the stock tests. That said, all other features are enabled, allowing the CPU to clock down at idle. All tests are run with the CPU cooler’s fan pegged at 100% PWM for the base results. Meanwhile, all coolers are tested at a noise-normalized 45 dBA to demonstrate their performance at an acceptable noise output for the majority of users. As for the overclocked results, the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X has been pushed to 4.0 GHz at 1.22 volts. Refer to this article for a full breakdown of our testing procedures.

    The idle test consists of the CPU sitting idle at the desktop for 15 minutes.

    The primary load test consists of the Blender BMW render looped for 15 minutes, and the peak temperature is used as the result.

    The final test we use is AIDA64’s FPU stability test, which ensures maximum heat generation. While it is typically considered an unrealistic workload, it is used to show the overhead a CPU cooler has available in a worst-case scenario.

    All these tests are completed three times for both maximum performance and noise-normalized results.

    Idle Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    Typical Load Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    Maximum Load Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review
    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    Intel Test System and Temperature Results

    Intel Test System
    Processor: Intel Core i9-10900K
    4.3 GHz Stock / 4.8 GHz OC
    Motherboard: ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XII FORMULA
    Intel Z490
    Memory: 2x 8 GB Crucial DDR4 3200 CL22
    Model: CT2K8G4DFRA32A
    Graphics Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1650
    Ventus XS OC Edition
    Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2 NVMe SSD
    Power Supply: Chieftec Chieftronic PowerPlay 850
    Case: Thermaltake Core P3
    Operating System: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
    Version 20H2 (October 2020 Update)
    Thermal Paste: Noctua NT-H2
    Other: Crucial Ballistix 2x 4GB DDR4 2400
    Model: BL2K4G24C16U4B
    (clearance testing only)

     

    Testing Procedure

    On the Intel test platform, we opted for the Core i9-10900K. To find our starting point on the Intel system, we used the Noctua NH-U12S with the fan set to maximum performance. With the stock BIOS, we disabled all multi-core enhancement features and stuck with Intel’s specifications. We then used Blender 3D to determine our processor’s default all-core clock speed of 4.3 GHz. To ensure testing remains fair on all coolers, we manually applied the CPU’s Vcore, which was 1.01 volts, and limited the CPU to the predetermined clock speed. While not an ideal situation, it is the only way to get an apples-to-apples comparison between coolers that is consistent. For overclock testing, the motherboard has MCE enabled, and all limits are removed. We then set the CPU to 4.8 GHz at 1.21 volts. This results in the CPU going from the 125-watt limit defined by Intel all the way up to 200 watts under a sustained heavy load. Again, refer to this article for a full breakdown of our testing procedures.

    The idle test consists of the CPU sitting idle at the desktop for 15 minutes.

    The primary load test consists of the Blender BMW render looped for 15 minutes, and the peak temperature is used as the result.

    The final test we use is AIDA64’s FPU stability test, which offers maximum heat generation. While it is typically considered an unrealistic workload, it is used to show the extra overhead a CPU cooler has available in a worst-case scenario.

    All these tests are completed three times for both maximum performance and noise-normalized results.

    Idle Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    Typical Load Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    Maximum Load Temperatures

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    Noise Levels and Fan Speeds

    Testing Procedure

    Noise testing is done at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% fan speeds, with the dBA level being recorded by a BAFX 3370 digital sound level meter at a distance of 15 cm. The fan(s) RPM results are taken at the same 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% settings. ASUS AI Suite is used for fan control in order to give users the overall noise profile of the tested CPU cooler.

    Noise Levels

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    Fan Speeds

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

    Performance Summary

    These charts showcase the cooler’s overall performance utilizing only stock and overclocked results for Idle and Blender. FPU tests have been omitted because they are not typical workloads. The results themselves have been split into two categories: maximum performance and noise-normalized results. These results have been further separated into graphs for AMD and Intel. This was done for those who care more about headroom and performance; you are shown what a cooler offers and how it does at more acceptable noise output on your platform of choice.

    AMD Performance Summary

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    Intel Performance Summary

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    Performance per Dollar

    When it comes to the overall performance of a cooler, price can be a significant determining factor. As such, the performance-per-dollar graph delivers. The list below shows how each CPU cooler stacks up to the competition by using each manufacturer’s MSRP for pricing. If no MSRP has been listed, pricing is taken from Amazon or Newegg. If no reputable retailer in the USA has the reviewed cooler, pricing will be obtained by checking reputable online retailers in the EU. Pricing, once established, will be converted directly into US dollars. For this test, only the cooler’s maximum performance is used, not the noise-normalized results. This is because the graph shown here focuses on the maximum performance you get for the money.

    Note that performance per dollar is based on the maximum performance the cooler offers. As such, the stock and overclocked results with the fans set to 100% were used. This is because we are looking at the maximum performance you can get for your hard-earned dollars. Once again, results for Intel and AMD are kept separate for a better look at your platform of choice.

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

     

    ID-Cooling SE-207-XT Black Review

作者 frank

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